Tuesday, December 5, 2017

The Endpoint Imperative: ID’ing and Overcoming the Stumbling Blocks to Digital Transformation

Digital Transformation is the No 1 priority for organizations large and small. It’s imperative that IT remove any obstacles to digital transformation success – including outdated PCs and mobile devices. Intel’s Kaitlin Murphy has some pointers to assure that your PC fleet and mobile devices are not your Digital Transformation Stumbling Blocks.

Kevin: Hello everyone and welcome to this episode of "The Endpoint Imperative" podcast series from Intel. My name is Kevin L. Jackson and I'm your host for this series. This episode's topic is identifying and overcoming digital transformation stumbling blocks. With me is Kaitlin Murphy, director of marketing for business clients at Intel. Kaitlin it's great to have you back.

Kaitlin: Thanks, I'm glad to be back.

Kevin: In my last episode I was talking with Yasser Rasheed, and he told us about how the IT security model is changing. Earlier you had talked about even more than that is changing, and that the PC is at the center of what's being called digital transformation. Can you tell us more about that?

Kaitlin: Sure. One of the core tenets of digital transformation is building in digital environment, where employees can work wherever they want, whenever they want, and however they want. To some degree that means using the technology they want, which includes the PC. The PC is a very personal device and it's heavily relied upon on a daily basis. In fact, there was a recent global survey that said 95% of respondents chose the PC if they could only have one device to use during the workday. So, for lots of employees the PC is the thing that they need to be productive. It's literally the gateway to access everything. The tools, the apps, and data and then to be able to do things with it, not to mention communicate with others.

It isn't just a consumption device, it's a creation device too. And with each generation of new platform, new features, new enhancements are introduced, and they help employees to be able to perform the way they want. Delivering performance improvements and security improvements too. It also benefits IT and they've realized the importance of prioritizing the new devices in the transformation, so that they can take advantage of those capabilities.


Kevin: Can we zoom in on this migration to Windows 10. What does that mean to the organizations in their digital transformation?

Caitlin: The moving to Windows 10 a new hardware is one of the quickest and easiest ways to take advantage of the best of both worlds. New hardware in conjunction with the new software delivers the best performance, the best security, and ultimately the best experience, both for end users and for IT organizations. And Intel powered devices are a great way to unlock that premium performance, for things like mobility, touch and workloads. Think about battery life, you can literally have a battery that lasts you all day. You're not tethered to your desk or to a power cord. Then there's multitasking. We all multitask, and the performance today allows people to be running multiple things at the same time and not be slowed down.

Not to mention there's huge enhancements with the introduction of Windows 10. Just think of the optimization in 365 and all the touch capabilities. Especially with the tight development relationship between Intel, Microsoft and OEMs you just can't find a bunch of well integrated devices to meet their needs and how they want to work. Like the two in one options, they have dials and touch and they can use a bunch of different modality based upon what the person is trying to do and how they feel most comfortable doing it.

Kevin: It sounds like a lot of new capabilities for the end users, but what is the biggest challenge you see facing organizations as they ramp up for this transformation?

Kaitlin: For any large-scale transformation is difficult, right? It's complex and it takes time. Not just time to execute but time for the people to adjust as well, and the culture. One big issue we hear about is the proliferation of more devices. How do you secure and manage all of them? So, think about it. Digital transformation is anchored in PC's but it's actually a lot larger than that. It's about building that digital environment. In doing so also involve deploying ambient compute, things like sensors from lighting temperature control, or intelligence in the conference room so that meetings it can start faster and deliver improved collaboration capabilities. Each of these pieces of compute has to be maintained right, both security managed, and that presents a challenge.

Kevin: Wow, sounds like the digital transformation can be really hard for the organization. But now we're out of time for this episode. I'd like to really thank Kaitlin Murphy with Intel, for providing us her insights and expertise. Thanks.

Kaitlin: Thank you.


( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)


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Friday, December 1, 2017

Industry Verticals Tackle Unstructured Data


Organizations around the world are struggling to cope with the current data explosion. A vital characteristic of this data is that it is unstructured and represents things like email, images, and videos.  Storage of this form of data is typically in an object format which differs significantly from the database norm. Databases housed data grows very slowly because most of it is structured. Object storage formats are now being used to optimize access to large amounts of non-transactional files across a growing number of vertical markets. These markets include:

  • Media and Entertainment – video Pre- through Post-Production which requires secure distribution and hassle-free scalability on a mix of standard hardware
  • Retail Consumers - HTTP accessible Photo and Video Sharing that offloads SQL databases to custom metadata which significantly reduces web applications complexity and latency
  • Research (images, raw datasets) – Which requires robust multi-tenancy for shared access to large datasets and integrated metadata customization.
  • Digital asset management (unstructured files) -  A global scale-out storage repository with integrations to Alfresco and other S3-based asset management solutions.
Companies in every one of these markets face many storage challenges where traditional file-based storage systems tend to fall short.



One more critical example lies in the healthcare industry where PACS [picture archiving and communication system] systems store images derived from MRIs. In most cases, law or by policy requires retention of this data for up to 30 years. Although the customer may be charged for the image when taken, the healthcare provider is responsible for the ongoing cost of storage.

Another crucial industry vertical that is feeling the data storage squeeze is law enforcement. Many agencies are now using cloud computing services for delivering mission-critical information to officers in the field. Standard applications include digital video evidence storage, management, and cataloging; crime mapping and analytics; records management; and backup for disaster recovery. Mike Donlan, Microsoft Vice president of State and Local Government Engineering Sales estimates that the average United States city or county now owns between four or five petabytes of data, with that requirement expected to double every two years. 


Object storage is perfect for tackling these unstructured storage business requirements because: 
  • Scalability - Object storage does not face the same file count and capacity limits of file-based NAS systems.
  • Interoperability - Object storage has better interoperability with various protocols with the flexibility needed to move data across a global namespace.
  • Data Backup - Continuous data backup protection that reduces the risk of data loss and can reduce data restoration time after a system failure.
  • Pay-as-you-grow pricing – Avoidance of substantial capital expenditures for storage acquisition through a pay-as-you-go economic model.
  • Searchability – More effective and efficient use of metadata

According to PC World, one of the more exciting object storage providers is Wasabi Technologies. To meet these growing industry vertical challenges, they are offering an object storage solution that offers six times the performance of Amazon's S3 service at one-fifth the price. This startup’s service is available globally and claim that their single pool of capacity can deliver primary, secondary or archive data at a sustained-read speed of 1.3GB per second, versus 191MB per second at Amazon. To support law enforcement needs, Wasabi has deployed in fully secure and CJIS-compliant redundant data centers. Wasabi storage services were awarded the official CJIS ACE Compliance Seal by Diverse Computing, a trusted third-party law enforcement agency solution provider with deep CJIS audit and compliance expertise.  Enterprise Strategy Group analyst SteveDuplessie sees this as an ideal option for enterprises looking to use cloud storage as a much cheaper alternative than traditional storage options.



( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





Cloud Musings
( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017)



Monday, November 27, 2017

The Endpoint Imperative: The Perimeter is Dead; Long Live the Perimeter!

Cloud, mobility and the Internet of Things have obliterated the traditional perimeter that protected organizations. The result: Higher productivity, but bigger challenges for security, data protection, and mobile device management.

This episode of the “The Endpoint Imperative” podcast series from Intel, Kevin L. Jackson and Intel’s Yasser Rasheed explore the new normal for security, with a focus on the end users.

Kevin: The topic for this episode is,"The Perimeter is Dead, Long Live the Perimeter". With me is Yasser Rasheed Director of Business Client Security with Intel. Yasser welcome back.

Yasser: Hi Kevin, happy to be back.

Kevin: This time, however, I'd like to really talk to you about this security perimeter thing. Cloud mobility and the internet things have really obliterated what I've always referred to as the wall and moat security paradigm, where working inside the enterprise was safe but working outside of the company's walls wasn't. What's pending impact of this evolution?

Yasser: You know Kevin nowadays with the cloud and mobility trends, we as end users we take our devices and work anywhere and everywhere at anytime. We take our laptops and work from home or from a coffee shop or on the go during the trip. The new shift here is really making us re-think how we protect the information that we have access to. The concept or the traditional concept of protecting at the perimeter with the traditional firewalls and gateways is really non-existent anymore. When I'm using my laptop at a coffee shop, I am no longer going through a firewall to access a cloud service. It's imperative for the industry to re-think the concept of listening at the perimeter level from a security perspective.

Kevin: Did the IT team miss the boat with getting a grip on the management of security within this new business ecosystem of today?

Yasser: From my perspective, it's not about missing the boat as much as the industry is moving and evolving very fast and IT organizations, more specifically information security organizations, need to cope with this evolution, and in certain cases may need to be ahead of it. At the same time, by the same token, that evolution is giving an advantage to the hacker community, to the bad guys really, to take advantage of the shift and attack the endpoints. Attack the end users, grab the data, steal the data or lock it in and ask for ransom.

Kevin: These new approaches to information technology have really changed the traditional workplace. Yasser how are IT leaders balancing the benefits of cloud and mobility, things like productivity and accessibility, with the obvious security challenges?


Yasser: Great question Kevin. We know that end users especially the new generations of end users focus tremendously on the ease of use and the productivity, and don't want to be burdened with additional security processes that they don't really comprehend. It's imperative for the IT leaders and information security leaders to balance end-user productivity, the simplicity of integration for IT and the productivity end-user experience for end users. The only way for the industry to evolve and achieve the right level of protection is with the right balance. This is not an easy job to do, however, it's the only way for the industry to keep moving in this direction.

Kevin: Do you have any advice on how to make security everybody's job in this new normal?

Yasser: Great question. The first thing I advise everyone is for the leaders in the IT and information security industry to educate their teams and their end users. Education is king. We need to first educate them and get them to the level of comfort with the simple attacks like phishing and how scams happen. More importantly, IT organizations and information security organizations need to focus on four priorities. The top one is identity protection. That is really protecting against identity breaches which today constitute 80% or more of the total number of breaches. The second priority is to protect the data. Data protection is really an imperative because the data is the asset that the attackers are going after. The third priority is about detecting and preventing threats, especially the new and advanced threats that we see nowadays where signature-based detection of viruses is no longer sufficient, it's necessary but insufficient. The fourth and last priority is the ability to recover quickly from an event of a breach. The breach is a matter of when it happens, not if it happens, and organizations need to be ready recover quickly to a good level of productivity. These are the four priorities that I recommend the industry to focus on, and more importantly, apply the new techniques based on hardware-based security as opposed to traditional software-based security that is no longer sufficient in this space.

Kevin: With that sound advice we've come to the end of our time for this episode. We really want to thank Yasser Rasheed with Intel for his insights and expertise.

Yasser: Thank you, Kevin, it was a pleasure to be here.

( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





Cloud Musings
( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017)